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ACNT - Bachelor of Health Science (Nutritional Medicine)

Bachelor of Health Science (Nutritional Medicine)

Health and wellbeing are affected by multiple external and internal factors, some of which lead to functional disorders and chronic disease. The role of the Nutritional Medicine practitioner is to identify the cause of health issues, educate the patient and develop a treatment and prevention plan to re-establish and promote ongoing optimal health and wellbeing.

Nutritional Medicine combines the traditions of food as medicine and dietary planning with scientific advances in the use of nutrients at therapeutic doses in the treatment, management and prevention of disease. Nutritional Medicine incorporates the study of human nutrition, food pharmacology, biochemistry, the food system, relevant government regulations and public health and considers how each can impact our health.

This brand new degree is suitable for those who want a career combining nutrition science and human health.

Course Quick Guide

Qualification Title Bachelor of Health Science (Nutritional Medicine)

Study Options – Domestic Australian students

Full-time or Part-time On campus, blended delivery for both study options available (Sydney and Brisbane)

Study options – Overseas students

On campus full time

Start Dates

22 February, 6 June, 19 September 2016


Mid-term intakes may be available for some courses, please contact a Course & Career Advisor for further information

Course Length

Full Time: 3 years

Part Time: 6 years maximum

Entry Requirements

For international applicants equivalent IELTS 6.5 (Academic) with no skills band less than 5.5.
Year 12 or equivalent with ATAR 60.


Additional course entry requirement:

First Aid Certificate, Working with Children and Police Check before commencing clinical subjects.
Pass in a science subject at senior secondary level recommended Pass in standard English Band 4 or above.


Special entry requirements:

Demonstrated ability to undertake study at this level: work experience, and/or other formal, informal or non-formal study attempted and/or completed.

Finance Options - Domestic Australian students

HE-FEE HELP

Course study requirements

Full Time: 3 years

Part Time: 6 years

Full time = 3 x 10 week trimesters (1 year), plus examinations in week 12

Part time = 6 x 10 week trimesters (over two years)

No. of timetabled hours per week:

Full time = 4 x 3hr classes per week. Plus self-study 40hrs total per week.

Part time = 2 x 3hr classes per week. Plus self-study 20hrs total per week.

Assessment

Each subject you complete includes 3 assessments on average. Assessments are mapped to specific subject learning outcomes and may include quizzes, written assignments, presentations, reflective journal, case analysis, literature review, practical exams and written exams.

Location

Sydney Campus

Brisbane Campus

Delivered by

Australasian College of Natural Therapies (ACNT)

Accrediting body

TEQSA

CRICOS Course code

084577G

Training Package details: N/A

Not all courses are offered at every campus each intake. Please speak with a Course and Careers Advisor for more information.

Entry Requirements
> Industry Recognition

What You Will Learn

  • Biological and social sciences
  • Research
  • Nutritional and clinical studies
  • Alongside study in human nutrition
  • Nutritional science
  • Food packaging
  • Public health nutrition.

Students will gain hands on experience at Think Wellbeing Centre at Pyrmont Campus under the guidance of experienced practitioners in a clinical setting treating public patients. This prepares graduates to confidently and successfully commence practice in the community.

Career Prospects

As a graduate of ACNT’s Nutritional Medicine degree, there are a number of career opportunities available to you. There is a continually growing demand for skilled practitioners to work as Nutritionists in a number of settings such as:

  • Private practice
  • Complementary and multimodality clinics
  • Community programs
  • Sport & recreation centres
  • Food industry
  • Health retreats and day spas
  • Education
  • Research
  • Technical support
  • Product development
  • Retail and sales
  • Marketing and communication

Students will gain hands on experience at The Wellbeing Clinic under the guidance of experienced naturopaths in a clinical setting treating public patients. This prepares graduates to confidently and successfully commence practice in the community.

Science Bridging Course

At ACNT you'll have academic support right at the beginning; before you start your studies. Our Science Bridging Course is a beneficial induction to maths, chemistry, human biology and medical terminology that will ensure you are ready to study a Bachelor of Health Science. The bridging course is not a prerequisite for all students, and your Course and Career advisor will help you determine if you're required to complete the course by means of a test. The test and course are both completely free of charge and are used to ensure you’re set up to succeed in your studies at ACNT.

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Course Subjects

Please note these subject descriptions are subject to change.

Subject Name Subject Description

BHS101A Anatomy & Physiology 1

Anatomy and Physiology 1 introduces the basic concepts and terminologies required to study and understand the structure and function of the human body. The interaction between tissues, organs and systems that maintain homeostasis is covered in detail. In addition, this subject covers the structure and function of cells and epithelial tissue, the internal structural anatomy of the human body and the integumentary and musculoskeletal systems.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary health practitioners, as it enables them to understand the structure and function of the human body as well as the importance of homeostasis and the ways in which the body maintains this balance.

BHS102A Bioscience

Bioscience (BHS102A) provides a foundational knowledge for further studies in anatomy and physiology, clinical nutrition, biochemistry and pharmacology. It comprises the study of relevant concepts of general, physical and organic chemistry and includes atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical compound structure, nomenclature, behaviour and bonding as well as organic compounds and their basic properties and reactions.

Bioscience (BHS102A) is a crucial component of the modern healthcare practitioner’s education in order to provide the basic building blocks for structural and therapeutic knowledge.

BHS103A Counselling & Communication Skills

Counselling & Communication Skills encompasses counselling skills commonly needed by complementary and alternative healthcare practitioners. This subject comprises a practical approach to a variety of communication skills and strategies including promoting change, compliance, obstacles to change, systems, transition and self-care. Sessions facilitate the development of effective listening and responding skills, increased personal awareness and insight in order to assist the building of a therapeutic relationship.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary healthcare practitioners, as it enables them to understand and put into use communication skills essential for building a therapeutic relationship in practice and supporting clients through change.

BHS104A Anatomy & Physiology 2

Anatomy and Physiology 2 builds and expands on the information and skills learnt in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A). This subject continues to investigate the structure and function of the human body with special attention given to the interaction between tissues, organs and systems that maintain homeostasis. The structure and function of the respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic and special senses systems are covered in detail including the homoeostatic control mechanisms of each system and the integration of the systems in the body.

The study of Anatomy and Physiology 2 (BHS104A) is vital in the education of healthcare practitioners to enable them to understand the structure and function of the human body as well as the importance of homeostasis and the ways in which the body maintains balance.

BHS105A Biochemistry 1

Biochemistry 1 (BHS105A) is a core subject that builds upon the basic chemistry principles covered in Bioscience (BHS102A). It comprises an introduction to the basic biochemical compounds in the body. This subject includes the structure and function of carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, enzymes, lipids and nucleic acid, DNA and RNA. The concept of gene expression and regulation is discussed in addition to cellular membrane structure and transport through the membrane.

This subject provides a vital foundation for the complementary healthcare practitioner in the basic macromolecules essential for life. This knowledge will be built upon and expanded on in Biochemistry 2 (BHS202A) and further therapeutic subjects.

BHS106A Anatomy & Physiology 3

Anatomy and Physiology 3 builds and expands on the study of anatomy and physiological concepts introduced in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A) & 2 (BHS104A). This subject continues to investigate the structure and function of the human body with special attention given to the interaction between tissues, organs and systems that maintain homeostasis. The structure and function of the digestive, endocrine, urinary and reproductive systems are covered in detail including the homoeostatic control mechanisms of each system and the integration of the systems in the body.

This subject is vital in the education of healthcare practitioners to enable them to understand the structure and function of the human body as well as the importance of homeostasis and the ways in which the body maintains balance.

BHS107A Research & Evidence-Based Practice

Research & Evidence Based Practice provides essential knowledge in research methods and research article evaluation for complementary medicine students. This subject introduces the fundamentals of research practice and methods for the natural therapies including research design, methodology, analysis and basic statistical skills. This subject provides the student with the proficiency to be able to appropriately read, analyse and evaluate current healthcare research.

BHS201A General Pathology

General Pathology introduces the basic pathological processes operating in the body and the ways in which disease may result from injurious stimuli. Basic pathological processes of response to injury, growth abnormalities, degenerative disorders of the musculoskeletal and neurological systems, immunology, toxicology and microbiology, and their characteristic diseases are studied.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary healthcare practitioners as it enables them to understand the nature of various disease states, and correlates these at a cellular and gross anatomical level with clinical signs and symptoms that may be seen in practice.

BHS202A Biochemistry 2

Biochemistry 2 is a core subject that builds upon the basic chemistry principles set forth in Bioscience (BHS102A) and the basic biochemical principles set forth in Biochemistry 1 (BHS105A). This subject explains the processes of macromolecule metabolism and energy production and storage in the body. Included in this subject is the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids, the role of ATP and acetyl CoA in metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and the electron transport chain and biosignalling and chemical communication. A basic introduction to humoral and cellular immune response is also discussed. Biochemistry 2 (BHS202A) provides a vital foundation for the complementary healthcare practitioner in the basic macromolecules essential for life. In the Bachelor of Health Science (Naturopathy and Nutritional Medicine), this is also built upon in Nutritional Biochemistry (CAM205A).

BHS203A Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 1

Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 1 builds upon the basic pathological principles established in General Pathology (BHS201A) and comprises the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical physical diagnostics for various disease states. This subject includes diseases of the gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular systems. Clinical diagnostic skills for these various body systems are introduced together with laboratory diagnosis and include: examination techniques, commonly used laboratory tests and analysis and interpretation of findings.

BHS204A Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 2

Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 2 is a core subject that builds upon the concepts covered in Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 1 (BHS203A). This subject is comprised of the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical physical diagnostics for various disease states of the hematologic, pulmonary, musculoskeletal and integumentary systems. Clinical diagnostic skills for these various body systems are introduced together with laboratory diagnosis and include examination techniques, commonly used laboratory techniques and interpretation of findings.

BHS301A Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 3

Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 3 is a core subject that builds upon basic concepts covered in Pathophysiology & Clinical Diagnosis 2 (BHS204A). This subject comprises the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical physical diagnostics for various disease states of gerontology and aging and the endocrine, renal, urological and reproductive systems. Clinical diagnostic skills for these various body systems are introduced together with laboratory diagnosis and include examination techniques, commonly used laboratory techniques and interpretation of findings.

BHS302A Drug & Integrated Pharmacology

Drug & Integrated Pharmacology comprises a study of basic principles of pharmacology, the pharmacokinetics of drugs commonly used in medical practice and common interactions between drugs and natural remedies. Drugs for pain, inflammation, psychological functions, cancer, infection and the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive and endocrine systems are discussed.

Drug actions, uses, contraindications, adverse effects and interactions with natural remedies are discussed, together with implications for naturopathic prescribing. This subject is crucial for the modern healthcare practitioner to understand common medications that clients may be taking and common interactions between these medications and natural remedies. This subject also emphasizes the need for clear lines of communication and common language between doctors and complementary healthcare practitioners in order to obtain the best health outcomes for clients.

BHS401A Professional Practice

Professional Practice comprises the basic skills needed for the operation and management of a complementary healthcare practice and provides an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements that are pertinent to complementary healthcare.

CAM101A History & Philosophy of Complementary & Alternative Medicine

This subject explores the historical and philosophical paradigm of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) that underpins clinical practice and examines a range of different modalities currently practised in Australia. This subject aims to provide the clinical practitioner with a sound knowledge and understanding of the history, philosophy and science of CAM with particular emphasis on naturopathy, nutritional medicine and western herbal medicine. During the trimester students will have the opportunity to observe complementary and alternative medicine practice within the college clinic to further their understanding of how natural medicine history and philosophy under-pins current clinical practice.

CAM103A Nutritional Foundations 1

In this subject, students undertake a detailed and in-depth study of the macronutrients, protein, carbohydrates and lipids, and how these relate to human metabolism. Each individual macronutrient is studied in regards to their composition, biological function, dietary sources, recommended daily intake, factors contributing to excess states, and states of insufficiency and deficiency; and signs and symptoms associated with nutrient imbalances . This subject is a foundational subject across the degrees of Nutritional Medicine, Naturopathy and Western Herbal Medicine as it provides students with fundamental knowledge associated with human metabolism, and begins to build an understanding of the importance of nutrition in relation to human physiology and health.

CAM104A Food Science, Systems & Policy

This subject examines the way in which food is produced, processed and distributed in Australia. It provides students with an understanding of current practices and trends in primary production and food manufacturing and distribution. It also examines the laws governing food for sale and the politics of the food system.

CAM106A Nutrition, Society & Public Health

This subject builds on basic nutritional knowledge from Nutritional foundations 1 and 2 CAM103A & CAM203A. It aims to provide an understanding of the sociology of food, nutrition and health together with an understanding of the theory and practice of community and public health nutrition.

CAM201A Food as Medicine

This subject introduces students to the concept that food can be used as a form of medicine. Historical data and current research in the field of nutritional science has provided evidence that traditional dietary combinations and certain naturally occurring constituents found in food can initiate physiological effects in humans. This phenomenon has given rise to the term functional foods, and is now part of popular culture. This subject therefore makes an important contribution to the education of students studying health science building their awareness of the potential therapeutic function of food.

CAM203A Nutritional Foundations 2

In this subject, students undertake a detailed and in-depth study of the micronutrients which includes water- and fat-soluble vitamins and minerals and how these relate to human metabolism. This subject provides students with underpinning knowledge in relation to the correlation that exists between micronutrients and human physiology. Each individual micronutrient is studied in regards to structure, biological function, dietary sources, recommended daily intake and therapeutic doses. Also included are factors contributing to, and symptoms associated with, states of excess, insufficiency and deficiency. An introduction to nutrition throughout the lifespan completes this unit.

CAM205A Nutritional Biochemistry

This subject builds on the introductory units of Biochemistry and Nutritional Foundations 1 & 2 (BHS105A, CAM103A & CAM203A) providing students with foundational knowledge of nutritional biochemistry, which is essential for their further studies in nutrition. Students examine the forms, functions, mechanisms and actions of vitamins and minerals. Metabolism is examined from a nutritional biochemistry perspective, as oxidation, inflammation, and neurotransmitter synthesis. Students will also be introduced into the growing field of nutrigenomics.

CAM206A Clinical Studies 1

Bachelor of Health Science (majoring in Naturopathy, Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine) commence clinical studies with a common three subject series of Clinical Studies 1, 2 and 3 in which students observe clinical practice, develop communication and learn basic counselling skills and professional ethical practice.

Students will complete 25 hours of external observation over the trimester. In these external placements, students familiarise themselves with the day-to-day operation of naturopathic, nutritional, western herbal medicine and other health-care practices. They will observe practitioners and clients in consultation, undertake a range of administrative tasks and observe dispensaries in action. In addition, students will be guided through the process of reflective practice, learning how to reflectively write and analysis their clinical development.

This subject serves as an introduction into the operation of complementary health clinics from the perspective of the client and the practitioner. It provides an opportunity for the student to develop an awareness of the application of professional skills in a clinical setting. These skills are not only to do with the practice of complementary medicine but also generic clinical skills such as interpersonal relations, legal and ethical compliance business acumen and an appreciation of the Australian health care system.

CAM208A Lifespan Nutrition

In this subject students will examine the range of nutritional requirements that impact people at particular life stages including pre-conception, pregnancy, during lactation; infant, toddler, adolescent, adult and geriatric populations, as well as the specific issues affecting indigenous communities. Major non-communicable health conditions including obesity, cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease will also be explored.

CAM301A Health Promotion

This subject provides students with the knowledge and understanding of health promotion concepts within various settings within Australia. Students are introduced to the key theories and concepts regarding behavioural change as it relates to health status. This subject provides students with the opportunity to integrate their counselling and nutrition knowledge to devise and assess health promotion interventions.

CAM304A Nutrition Clinical Practicum 1

Bachelor of Health Science (Nutritional Medicine) students commence clinical studies with a common three-subject series of Clinical Studies 1, 2 and 3, in which students observe clinical practice, learn basic counselling, case taking and analysis skills. The Nutritional Medicine specialisation incorporates three subsequent clinical units: Nutrition Clinical Practicum 1, 2 and 3.

In Nutrition Clinical Practicum 1, students required to undertake 50 hours of clinical practicum working in a public student clinic. In this first Nutritional clinical practicum, students are paired with another student practitioner and are introduced to the operations of the clinic. Students will begin to manage patients, records and equipment, and undertake basic patient assessment and will learn how to safely dispense nutritional prescriptions.

In this practicum students are required to begin integrating all the theoretical and practical studies undertaken throughout the course in a public student clinic setting. This clinical experience provides the basic clinical framework for professional practice. For each presenting case, clinical practicum students are required to take a detailed history, conduct relevant assessment, critical analyse data the collected, to compose a holistic diagnostic understanding, construct therapeutic treatment aims, identify interactions, define mechanisms of action of selected nutritionals and propose a therapeutic prescription. Students are expected to act professionally, assure patients safety and demonstrate an awareness of practice limitations at all times.

Students in clinical practicum 1 are guided through this process under the strict direct supervision of an experienced clinical supervisor. No diagnosis or treatment will be made until the supervisor has determined the appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment proposed.

In addition, further integration and research is undertaken through the use of targeted case study, analysis and presentation subsequent to cases presentation to the clinical supervisor. Students continue to develop their reflective practice keeping logs/journals for each case and clinic session.

In addition, further integration and research is undertaken through the use of targeted case study, analysis and presentation.

CAM305A Clinical Studies 2

This is the second of three Clinical Studies subjects common to Bachelor of Health Science (majoring in Naturopathy, Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine).

This subject provides students with the opportunity to develop their pre-clinical and case history taking skills in a workshop setting. Students will explore a variety of case taking methods incorporating holistic, complementary and contemporary case taking methods. Students will be actively be engaged in case taking examples including the use of paper based, audio and video cases. This subject also builds on their understanding of the clinical practice as students will be undertaking 25 hours of clinical observation in the college student clinic over the trimester. Student will become familiarised in all facets of college clinic administration and procedures.

CAM306A Nutritional Therapeutics 1

Nutritional Therapeutics 1 is the first of two units in which students begin to integrate their science and nutritional knowledge for the support and treatment of particular health conditions. Students will examine specific body systems and associated health conditions, and develop treatment approaches in a case based learning environment. The digestive, neurological, immune, respiratory systems will be examined as will conditions affecting the special senses including the eyes and ears.

CAM307A Health Assessment & Diagnostic Techniques

In this subject students will use and expand on their knowledge of clinical diagnosis and nutritional assessment. Students will explore the diverse range of assessment techniques commonly used by complementary and alternative health professionals. They will be introduced to the functional interpretation of general pathology results and functional pathology.

CAM311A Clinical Studies 3

Following on from Clinical Studies 2 (CAM305A) students will now apply their theoretical knowledge of case taking, biomedicine and therapeutics to a conduct detailed case analysis and construction of therapeutic prescriptions. In this classroom based subject, students will work in small groups to practice and refine client consultation, case analysis and development of treatment methodology skills with ‘real’ clients.

After the introductory phase, students (under the guidance of an experienced practitioner) will participate in a simulated clinic environment, each week an assigned group will have responsibility for conducting the client consultation, there is one primary practitioner and a secondary practitioner. The class group will then have the opportunity to ask clarifying questions from the patient prior to the patient’s departure.

Facilitated by the experienced practitioner, the class will then work collaboratively to develop a detailed analysis using biomedical, holistic, CAM and naturopathic analysis techniques. Students will proceeds through the process of summarising, prioritising, analysing, filtering, determining a therapeutic strategy, treatment plan and prescription – modality specific. Upon case completion the leading practitioners receive one on one feedback from the supervisor at the end of the session.

CAM312A Nutritional Therapeutics 2

Nutritional Therapeutics 2 (CAM312A) builds upon Nutritional Therapeutics 1 (CAM306A) in which students begin to integrate their science and nutritional knowledge for the support and treatment of particular health conditions. Students will examine specific body systems and associated health conditions, and develop treatment approaches in a case based learning environment. The endocrine, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal reproductive, genito-urinary and dermatological systems will be examined.

CAM313A Nutrition Clinical Practicum 2

Nutrition Clinical Practicum 2, students are required to undertake 100 hours of clinical practicum providing students with the opportunity to practice, consolidate and extend the fundamental client management and clinical skills acquired in Nutritional Clinical Practicum 1. In addition, students are required to focus upon their time management and clinic promotion skills.

Students are enabled to work more independently during the critical case analysis phase, however, will continue to be closely monitored and supervised by the supervising practitioner.

For each presenting case, Nutrition Clinical Practicum 2 students are required to take a detailed history, conduct relevant assessment, critical analyse data the collected, to compose a holistic diagnostic understanding, construct therapeutic treatment aims, identify interactions, define mechanisms of action of selected nutritionals and propose a therapeutic prescription. Students are expected to act professionally, assure patients safety and demonstrate an awareness of practice limitations at all times. The therapeutic process remains similar to that of Nutrition Clinical Practicum 1, however, the expectation of the students capacity for critical case analysis, therapeutic construction and reflective practice has increased significantly.

No diagnosis or treatment will be made until the supervisor has determined the appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment proposed. In addition, further integration and research is undertaken through the use of targeted case study, analysis and presentation subsequent to cases presentation to the clinical supervisor. Students continue to develop their reflective practice keeping logs/journals for each case and clinic session.

CAM314A Nutrition Clinical Practicum 3

This is the final clinical subject of the Bachelor of Health Science (Nutritional Medicine) and is the culmination of all of the theoretical and practical studies undertaken to date.

In this final Nutrition Clinical Practicum unit, students are required to undertake 100 hours of clinical practicum. Students are expected to operate independently, and demonstrate the capacity to work with clients with a range of more complex health needs with limited guidance. Nutrition Clinical Practicum 3 students are expected to ensure their treatment approaches are informed by contemporary research and integrate relevant cultural, religious, gender, linguistic and social aspects of their clients into clinical decision making to ensure optimal client outcomes.

Students in Nutrition Clinical Practicum 3 are required to consistently demonstrate critical thinking, reflective practice and communicate clearly their insights to the clinical supervisor.

Whilst there will continue to be ongoing feedback and assessment from the supervising practitioner throughout this unit, students will undergo an OSCE at the end of the trimester to assess their level of skill in the above mentioned areas. Successful passing of the OSCE is essential to pass this final clinical unit.

CAM405A Integrative Complementary Medicine 1

Each week students will review the holistic approach to the treatment of specific body systems, and then apply and integrate this knowledge in the analysis of complex clinical cases. In this subject, students will be expected to integrate knowledge from the science subjects including pathology and clinical diagnosis with their therapeutic understanding of naturopathy, nutrition and herbal medicine to provide sound clinical decisions, derive appropriate treatment goals and suggest botanical, nutritional, diet and homoeopathic treatments – student will devise modality specific treatment regimens according to their degree specialisation.

Experienced clinicians will facilitate each case discussion, which will draw on contemporary research and clinical practicalities. This problem based learning subject covers the treatment of the nervous system, and endocrine, reproductive, renal and paediatric cases.

CAM407A Integrative Complementary Medicine 2

Each week students will review the holistic approach to the treatment of specific body systems, and then apply and integrate this knowledge in the analysis of complex clinical cases. In this subject, students will be expected to integrate knowledge from science subjects including pathology and clinical diagnosis with their therapeutic understanding of naturopathy, nutrition and herbal medicine, to provide sound clinical decisions, derive appropriate treatment goals and suggest botanical, nutritional, diet and homoeopathic treatments - student will devise modality specific treatment regimens according to their degree specialisation.

Experienced clinicians will facilitate each case discussion, which will draw upon contemporary research and clinical practicalities. This problem based learning subject covers the treatment of cases involving the musculoskeletal, endocrine, reproductive, and renal systems and paediatric and cancer support cases.

CAM410A Dietary Analysis & Planning

This subject is a core subject for final year students in the Bachelor of Health Science (Nutritional Medicine) and an elective for Bachelor of Health Science (Naturopathy) students. It will provide the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct thorough nutritional assessment and construct therapeutic dietary interventions in clinically specific disease states.

CAM411A Advanced Nutrition Medicine

This final year subject builds on and further integrates the concepts introduced in Nutritional Therapeutics 1 and 2 (CAM306A & CAM312A). Students will continue to learn how to devise comprehensive nutritional therapeutic strategies with an emphasis on complex health conditions and evidenced based practice.

For a full description of each unit please contact your Course and Career Advisor on 1300 017 267.