Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Medicine)

Discover the dietary and lifestyle factors required to live a life of good health while promoting positive well-being. You will learn all about the relationship between our health and diets, and the dietary changes needed for therapeutic relief of disease and illness.

You will also gain hands-on experience at the Think Wellbeing Centre under the guidance of experienced nutritionists, treating public patients. This will prepare you to confidently start practice

CRICOS CODE
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What you'll learn:

Course Delivery

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Workload and Assessment

Typical assessment includes:

Each subject you complete includes 3 assessments on average. Assessments are mapped to specific subject learning outcomes and may include quizzes, written assignments, presentation, reflective journal, case analysis, literature review and practical exams

Subject Information

Food Science, Systems and Policy (NUTR2004) examines the way in which food is produced, processed and distributed in Australia and globally. It provides students with an understanding of current practices and trends in primary production and food manufacturing and distribution. It also examines the laws governing food for sale and the politics of the food system and how these impact on public health initiatives as they relate to food security, sustainability and food deserts.

Human Structure & Physiology 2 will further develop knowledge of the structure and physiology of the human body with special attention given to the integration of human systems and beginning to explore the impact of disturbances in Homeostasis and disruption of normal function. The structure and function of the lymphatic, immune, digestive, nervous, endocrine, urinary, reproductive systems and the special senses are covered in detail including the homoeostatic control mechanisms of each system and the integration of the systems in the body. This subject builds on the knowledge and understandings of human structure and physiology, provides the foundation to look at disease, disorders and syndromes and their pathophysiology, in later subjects.

Evidence-based practice is an essential component of the exercise of clinical judgement in the delivery of quality healthcare. Students will also gain an understanding of how research evidence is translated into practice. This subject provides students with an introduction to health informatics, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and evidence-based practice. Students are guided through the skills necessary to locate, critique and interpret a research article for application to their practice. They will become familiar with quantitative and qualitative evidence, research methodology, basic descriptive and inferential statistics and the foundational skills to be able to evaluate and appraise evidence in healthcare research.

Human Structure & Physiology 1 introduces the basic concepts and terminologies required to study and understand the structure and function of the human body. This subject will build on the biological foundations by exploring the interaction and organisation of cells, tissues and organs which forms a basis to study the physiological integration of key body systems. The maintenance and regulation of the internal environment by homeostasis at a system level will be key to students understanding disruption and disease in later subjects. Key physiological and functional processes such as movement, metabolism, oxygenation and protection will be discussed, with body systems including the integumentary, musculoskeletal, respiratory and cardiovascular system the focus of this subject. This subject will provide the first part of an evidence based foundational knowledge of human physiology to guide health practice.

Biological Foundations explores the biological building blocks which make up the human body from the chemical level up to the cellular level. These essential chemistry concepts will assist with building relevant links to the study of human physiology in later subjects. The subject then explores the foundational studies in biochemistry which includes the structure and function of carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, lipids, DNA and RNA. The concepts of gene expression and regulation are discussed in addition to the cellular membrane structure and transport through the membrane. The study of the biology of the human cell concludes this subject and upon completion equips students to commence study at the tissue level of structure and physiology subjects.

This subject provides students an introduction to the diversity of health theories and initiatives to improve health outcomes. Students will engage with key concepts including human right to health, social determinants of health, equality, equity and vulnerability. An introduction to Australia’s health system and intersectoral action will also be provided.

In this subject students will examine the range of nutritional requirements that impact populations, communities and individuals at particular life stages including pre-conception, pregnancy, during lactation, infant, toddler, adolescent, adult and geriatric populations, as well as the specific issues affecting indigenous communities.

In this subject, students undertake a detailed and in-depth study of the micronutrients which includes water- and fat-soluble vitamins and minerals and how these relate to human metabolism. This subject provides students with underpinning knowledge in relation to the correlation that exists between micronutrients and human physiology. Each individual micronutrient is studied in regard to structure, biological function, dietary sources, recommended daily intake and therapeutic doses. Also included are factors contributing to, and symptoms associated with, states of excess, insufficiency and deficiency.

In this subject, students undertake a detailed and in-depth study of the macronutrients, protein, carbohydrates and lipids, and how these relate to human metabolism. Each individual macronutrient is studied in regards to their composition, biological function, dietary sources, recommended daily intake, factors contributing to excess states, and states of insufficiency and deficiency; and signs and symptoms associated with nutrient imbalances found in individuals and populations. Students will investigate how the management of these macronutrients contribute to the public health agenda.

Following on from Pre-Clinical Studies 1 (PCS207), students will apply their theoretical and practical knowledge of case taking, holistic, biomedical and therapeutics to conduct critical case analysis and management through the use of holistic evidence based principles, clinical examination skills, and techniques to implement appropriate therapeutic strategies and prescriptions in a simulated clinic environment. Students will refine interpersonal skills including patient counselling and develop their capacity to give and receive constructive feedback. Throughout the subject, students will reflect and develop their practitioner persona for future clinical practice. Students will also build on their understanding of clinical practice by undertaking 25 hours of clinical observation in the Student Clinic.

Nutritional Therapeutics 1 (NUT208) is the first of a two part series in which students begin to integrate their health science and human nutrition knowledge for the dietary and nutritional management of particular health conditions. Students will analyse and critically evaluate the evidence and examine specific body systems and associated health conditions to develop treatment approaches in a case based learning environment. The digestive, hepatobiliary, neurological, immune, respiratory systems and conditions affecting the special senses including the eyes and ears will be examined.

Clinical Assessment builds on the theory of the Human Systems & Pathophysiology subjects and develops practical skills for clinical assessment and examination of the client. Skills for history taking, gathering clinical information, observing clinical manifestations, critically analyse signs and symptoms, identifying red flags, interpreting medical reports, pathology tests and diagnostic imaging are developed. Students will explore a range physical examination techniques using appropriate equipment to reach primary and differential diagnoses. Students will develop and practice skills in effective communication, respecting clients’ privacy, work health and safety concerns as well as the need for referral to other health care practitioners in a professional manner.

Pre-Clinical Studies 1 (PCS207) is the first of the two part series of Pre-Clinical subjects in which students observe clinical practice, learn effective communication and counselling skills and professional ethical practices. This subject reinforces evidence based practices and the principles and philosophies of natural medicine, which sets the basis for guiding students to progress and evolve through the development of critical thinking, case history taking skills and communicating holistic understanding, and the therapeutic plan in a workshop setting.
Students will complete a minimum of 25 hours of external observation over the trimester. Students will familiarise themselves with the day-to-day operation of clinical practice. They will observe practitioners and clients in consultation, undertake a range of administrative tasks and observe dispensaries in action. This provides an opportunity for the student to develop an awareness of the application of professional skills in a clinical setting. These skills are not only to do with the practice of complementary medicine but also clinical skills such as interpersonal relations, scope of practice, duty of care and ethical compliance business acumen and an appreciation of the Australian health care system.

Human Systems & Pathophysiology 2 builds upon the concepts explored in Human Systems & Pathophysiology 1 and continues to expand student’s skills and knowledge in pathophysiology and the human disease process, in relation to individual, community and public health. The pathophysiology and symptomatology will be covered for various disease states of the musculoskeletal, integumentary, hematologic, pulmonary, endocrine, renal and reproductive systems. Conditions specific to gerontology and aging will also be considered.
– General diagnostic approaches will be introduced and the commonly used laboratory tests and interpretation of such findings for the associated disorders and conditions will continue to be developed.

Food as Medicine (FAM203) introduces students to the concept that food can be used as a form of medicine to promote health and wellbeing and treat and prevent disease. This subject provides an overview of farming practices, food preparation, cooking and storage methods, as well as food manufacturing and processing techniques and their impacts on the nutritional value of foods. Students will investigate nutritional food-based science including the health effects of food additives, food safety and phytochemical toxicity. An in depth study of food evolution, historical, cultural and modern uses of food as medicine and the medicinal properties of food is also examined. The benefits and disadvantages of new dietary models are also explored. Students will explore the potential therapeutic function of food, the relationship of phytochemical constituents and disease, and their physiological effects on humans. Students will learn how to apply evidence based nutrition knowledge to illustrate the use of food as a therapeutic tool and provide food-based recommendations in health and disease

Human Biochemistry explains the processes of macromolecule metabolism, energy production and storage in the body. Included in this subject are the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids; the role of ATP and acetyl CoA in metabolism; oxidative phosphorylation, the electron transport chain, biosignaling and chemical communication. The concept of gene expression and regulation is also explored. Human Biochemistry provides healthcare practitioners a vital foundation on the basic macromolecules and genetic understandings essential for life. This knowledge will be built upon and expanded further in later subjects.

Human Systems & Pathophysiology 1 is the first of two subjects that builds upon the foundational studies in Human Structure & Physiology and then expands student’s skills and knowledge into the area of pathophysiology and human disease process. Understanding the pathogenic process and the disruption of homeostasis in relation to disease will be important concepts, in the context of individual, community and population health.

This subject will cover:
– Basic pathological processes in response to injury and growth abnormalities.
– Immunology, toxicology, microbiology, and their characteristic diseases.
– Pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical manifestations for diseases of the gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular systems.
– Introduction to commonly used laboratory tests and interpretation of findings.

This subject builds on concepts developed in human biochemistry and the foundations of nutritional science. The biochemical structure and function of macro and micronutrients and biochemical mechanisms associated with digestion, absorption, transport and storage are examined. The integration of biochemical mechanisms of nutrients with disease pathophysiology is explored. This subject also provides an in depth understanding of the microbiome, biological oxidation, inflammation, antioxidants, liver detoxification and neurotransmitter synthesis. Students will learn about nutritional genomics and epigenetics and how they relate to professional practice. The clinical relevance and importance of nutritional biochemistry for the nutritional management of major diseases is also emphasised.

Integrated Pharmacology comprises a study of basic principles of pharmacology, the pharmacokinetics of drugs commonly used in medical practice and common interactions between drugs and natural remedies. Drugs for pain, inflammation, infection, mental health, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive and endocrine systems are discussed. Drug actions, uses, contraindications, adverse effects and interactions with natural remedies are discussed, together with implications for naturopathic, nutritional and western herbal medicine prescribing. This subject is crucial for the modern healthcare practitioner to understand common medications that patients may be taking and common interactions between these medications and natural remedies. This subject also emphasises the need for clear lines of communication and common language between doctors and complementary healthcare practitioners in order to obtain the best health outcomes for clients.

This final year subject builds on and further integrates the concepts introduced in Nutritional Therapeutics 1 and 2. Students will explore the evidence base for advanced clinical nutrition and extend their knowledge of therapeutic mechanisms and application of nutrients and phytochemicals through a functional and integrated systems approach. Foetal programming, mitochondrial dysfunction, genetic polymorphisms, neurological, metabolic, and inflammatory disease, and cancer will be explored. Students will continue to learn how to devise comprehensive nutritional therapeutic strategies with an emphasis on complex health conditions. In this subject, students will be expected to integrate knowledge from Clinical Assessment, Research & Evidence Based Practice and Nutritional therapeutics to provide clinically informed decisions in developing nutrition interventions for complex clinical cases.

Nutrition Clinical Practicum 2, students are required to undertake 100 hours of clinical practicum providing students with the opportunity to practice, consolidate and extend the fundamental client management and clinical skills acquired in Nutritional Clinical Practicum 1. In addition, students are required to focus upon their time management and clinic promotion skills. Students are enabled to work more independently during the critical case analysis phase, however, will continue to be closely monitored and supervised by the supervising practitioner. For each presenting case, Nutrition Clinical Practicum 2 students are required to take a detailed history, conduct relevant assessment, critical analyse data the collected, to compose a holistic diagnostic understanding, construct therapeutic treatment aims, identify interactions, define mechanisms of action of selected nutritionals and propose a therapeutic prescription. Students are expected to act professionally, assure patients safety and demonstrate an awareness of practice limitations at all times. No diagnosis or treatment will be made until the supervisor has determined the appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment proposed. In addition, further integration and research is undertaken through the use of targeted case study, analysis and presentation subsequent to cases presentation to the clinical supervisor. Students continue to develop their reflective practice keeping logs/journals for each case and clinic session.

This subject is a core subject for final year students in the Bachelor of Health Science Clinical Nutrition and an elective for the Bachelor of Health Science Naturopathy and Bachelor of Health Science Western Herbal Medicine students. This subject will provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct thorough nutritional assessment and construct therapeutic dietary interventions in clinically specific disease states. This subject will also provide students with the fundamental skills in communication and counselling techniques to be used when consulting and effectively communicating with culturally diverse groups and patients. Students will learn the counselling and education skills required to implement behavioural change in professional practice as Health Practitioners.

In Nutrition Clinical Practicum 1, students are required to undertake 50 hours of clinical practicum working in a public student clinic. Students are paired with another student practitioner and are introduced to the operations of the clinic. Students will begin to manage patients, records and equipment, and undertake basic patient assessment and will learn how to safely dispense nutritional prescriptions under the strict direct supervision of an experienced clinical supervisor. No diagnosis or treatment will be made until the supervisor has determined the appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment proposed. In this practicum students are required to begin integrating all the theoretical and practical studies undertaken throughout the course in a public student clinic setting. This clinical experience provides the basic clinical framework for professional practice. For each presenting case, clinical practicum students are required to take a detailed history, conduct relevant assessment, critical analyse data the collected, to compose a holistic diagnostic understanding, construct therapeutic treatment aims, identify interactions, define mechanisms of action of selected nutritionals and propose a therapeutic prescription. Students are expected to act professionally, assure patients safety and demonstrate an awareness for scope of practice. In addition, further integration and research is undertaken through the use of targeted case study, analysis and presentation subsequent to case presentation to the clinical supervisor. Students continue to develop their reflective practice keeping logs for each case and clinic session.

Nutritional Therapeutics 2 (NUT301) builds upon Nutritional Therapeutics 1 (NUT208) in which students begin to integrate health science and human nutrition knowledge for the dietary and nutritional management of particular health conditions. Students will analyse and critically evaluate the evidence and examine specific body systems and associated health conditions to develop treatment approaches in a case based learning environment. The endocrine, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, reproductive, urinary and renal, and dermatological systems will be examined. Pediatric conditions and HIV and Aids will also be reviewed.

This subject includes the development of the students own voice through exploring and experimenting with new ideas in making and/or interpreting work. The student will develop acquired skills, develop conceptual skills and ideas, evaluate their own work and research work opportunities. The student consolidates their knowledge of the design industry, design as a profession and the relationship between design and other industries.
The student applies industry knowledge to work activities, maximising effective performance and also gains knowledge of ways to maintain currency in design industry trends and practice.

In this subject, students write a literature review on a topic of their choice, which must examine a clinical aspect of their speciality. The emphasis is on presenting and critically evaluating current literature by searching for and appraising the literature, and writing a clear and fully referenced literature review. Students will be expected to present a proposal early in the trimester, and a full literature review by the end of the trimester. The in class experience is practical in nature where the students are provided a collaborative environment to cover the process of writing a literature review, ask questions and receive feedback on their own projects.

In this subject students will explore the relationship between diet and nutrition. With a focus on major noncommunicable diseases and vulnerable populations, students will explore nutrition related disease states and the role of nutritional interventions from a population and community perspective and how these impact on disease in society, and policy. Major non-communicable health conditions including obesity, cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease will be explored.

This subject provides students with the knowledge and understanding of health promotion concepts within various settings within Australia. Students are introduced to the key theories and concepts regarding behavioural change as it relates to health status. This subject provides students with the opportunity to integrate their counselling and nutrition knowledge to devise and assess health promotion interventions.

This subject allows students to undertake a piece of research within a special population of their choice, focusing on an issue which is allied to or impacted by nutrition. This unit is the equivalent to a capstone unit, drawing together the learning of the core public health curriculum with the nutrition specialism to allow students to apply all their learning and skills to a project of their choice, generating an outcome they can evidence in pursuit of the preferred career choice.

This subject develops students understanding of public health nutrition in a population and community context. Students explore health promotion strategies from a social and behavioural science approach to population health problems. Students will investigate public health nutrition goals and initiatives, the development of effective programs and nutrition-related policies.

The theoretical base of this subject focuses on developing the students’ understanding of the fundamental contemporary theories of social entrepreneurship and a variety of applicable business models. The course will explore cross discipline material encompassing design, business and technology and how to acquire and combine knowledge and skills in all 3 areas to amplify the potential for success in 21st century society. At the core of this subject will be a focus on customer experience design, both theory and skill, and why user centric principles are increasingly used in business today.

Students will explore the application of entrepreneurship business strategies and apply this knowledge in a philanthropic context and come up with solution to a real world problem they can execute to the pitch ready stage for investment. The project will entail some type of ‘design for good’ aspect in either a profit or non- for-profit business model.

Students will be expected to think critically as they evaluate complex ideas and learn the patterns, frameworks and mechanics or storytelling, behavior design, game design and platform design.

Students will be expected to:

  • Students will banalyse a social problem that needs to be solved
  • Plan and progress an idea through a business development lifecycle
  • Plan and progress an idea through a buutilising a self-constructed questionnaire
  • sSynthesise and visualise quantitative and qualitative data in order to communicate the patterns they discover in the data collected
  • learning the basics of using a business model and value proposition canvas as tools for design
  • Create, present, and communicate a professional-level business deck along with a functional prototype in order to demonstrate their understanding of theoretical and practical concepts
  • Learn and practice lean start-up and design thinking principles in the validation of their business idea along with validation of the prototype for the product or service they create.